Oct 112008
 

[Translate] The pomegranate originated in Persia and has been cultivated in Georgia, Armenia and the Mediterranean region for several millennia. Jewish tradition teaches that the pomegranate is a symbol for righteousness, because it is said to have 613 seeds which corresponds with the 613 mitzvot or commandments of the Torah. For this reason and others, many Jews eat pomegranates on Rosh Hashanah. However, the actual number of seeds varies with individual fruits. It is also a symbol of fertility.  Some Jewish scholars believe that it was the pomegranate, not the apple, that was the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden.Pomegranate is one of the Seven Species (שבעת המינים, Shiv’at Ha-Minim), that are mentioned in Click here to continue reading this post

Oct 062008
 

[Translate] I am still trying to finalize my menu for the pre-fast meal on Wednesday afternoon. I don’t want to over do it. For erev Yom Kippur: Roasted chicken quarters with Hashu filling (Syrian ground beef, rice and pine nuts) Steamed green beans Fruit salad For break-the-fast: Crackers Cheese Smoked Salmon Baba Ganoush About 1 hour later, we will have: Chicken soup with matza balls Pomegranate Curd Tart Mr. Baroness Tapuzina and I hope that you have an easy fast. Gmar Chatimah Tova (May you be sealed in the book of life).

Sep 242008
 

[Translate] Chag Sameach everyone! We have been invited to family for the holiday and I will be bringing dessert. I am still trying to decide which cake I am going to make, but I wanted to share some of my ideas with you before the holiday begins. I will post which one I make as soon as I decide. Here are my choices: Greek Pistachio Honey Cake Ka’ikeh b’Ah’sal (Honey Cake With Sesame Glaze) Nigella Lawson’s Chocolate Honey Cake Beekeeper’s Honey Cake (I made this last year) I have also found some interesting recipes for the rest of the meal: Rubuh’ (roast veal stuffed with spiced ground meat and rice) Ejjeh b’kerrateh (leek fritters) Georgian Meatballs Click here to continue reading this post

Dec 212007
 

[Translate] One of the things that I really like about winter is chestnut season. I remember fondly when my grandmother would splurge and buy chestnuts every december. They were quite expensive when I was a child, but the house smelled so nice when she was roasting them in the oven. My first experience of eating fire roasted chestnuts was not until I lived in Europe. I couldn’t wait to see the vendors rolling their carts yelling “Roasted Chestnuts” in German, Italian or French. I loved biting into their floury goodness and now I enjoy finding recipes in which they can be used to accent a dish. I had some goulash meat in the freezer that Click here to continue reading this post

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