Sep 292007
 

[Translate] Friday night we decided to have fish, so I made my take on Fish and Chips. I use all types of fish filets for shallow frying, such as cod, halibut and flounder. On Friday, I used red mullet, or barbounia as it is called in Hebrew. We had the following: Cocktail hour: Mango-Pineapple Caipirinha Red Mullet with a Panko-Sesame, Oregano and Parsley Crust Crushed Potatoes with Chives, Garlic, and Yogurt Green peas Heilbronner Stiftsberg Riesling 2005 Leftover Quince Tart PrintRed Mullet with a Panko-Sesame, Oregano and Parsley Crust Serving Size: 2 350g (3/4lb) small or 4 medium red mullet filets 2 cups panko crumbs 1 tablespoon fresh parsley 1 tablespoon fresh oregano or thyme Click here to continue reading this post

Sep 212007
 

[Translate] Tonight, I making a simple two course meal consisting of a Moroccan Kdra called Djej Kdra Touimiya or Chicken Kdra with Almonds and Chick-Peas, green beans, and some fresh fruit for dessert. A Kdra is a tagine that is cooked with smen (I have to use olive oil), onions, saffron, cinnamon and sometimes ginger, depending on where you live. I am making a Fez version, which is made with a little dried ginger. I think I was Moroccan in a former life because I am in love with the food, the architecture, the music and the culture in general. My earliest introduction to Moroccan food was when I bought Paula Wolfert’s, Couscous and Other Click here to continue reading this post

Sep 212007
 

[Translate] Tomorrow at sundown begins the observance of and twenty-five hour fast during Yom Kippur. The meal before the fast should be simple, not too rich and not too spicy. It is better not to make the meal with garlic or hot peppers. At the completion of the fast, it is better to eat something that is not too hard on the stomach, so we usually break the fast by eating biscuits (cookies) and crackers, and of course some water, but not too fast or you will upset your stomach. A Yemenite co-worker told me today that I should drink a glass of fresh pomegranate juice before the fast, it will make the fast easier. Click here to continue reading this post

Sep 152007
 

[Translate] Chag Sameach everyone! I hope you had a nice meal with your family. We went to my cousin’s house for the first night of Rosh Hashana and had a lovely time. We invited some friends of ours for dinner last night. My husband made a Rosh Hashana favourite and I introduced several new surprises to our repertoire. Everything was delicious. The cake calls for sour cream and one of my guests has a dairy allergy and can only tolerate butter in baked goods, so I substituted a non-dairy yogurt in its place. It worked fine. And in case you are wondering about why I served a dairy cake, we keep kashrut according to the Click here to continue reading this post

Sep 082007
 

[Translate] At sundown on the 12th of September is the beginning of the Days of Awe which last ten days including the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana and ending with the 25-hour fast of Yom Kippur. During these ten days, we are suppose to meditate on the subject of the holidays and ask for forgiveness from anyone we have wronged. During this month and the beginning of October, I will be blogging on holiday dishes for Rosh Hashana, Yom Kippur and Sukkot. I would like to wish my family and friends a Joyous and Healthy New Year. May yours be a sweet year and may your names be inscribed in the book of life. To Click here to continue reading this post

Sep 072007
 

[Translate] Every Thursday my team takes a 30 minute break to go to the rooftop and enjoy the fresh air and homemade goodies that each team member, in turn, brings. Sometimes we have the break in the morning, and have breakfast goodies, and sometimes we have the break in the afternoon. We change it around for variety and the last couple of months we decided the theme would be cakes and ice cream. When we had the breakfast round, one of my colleagues brought a gas burner and made omelets. They were delicious. This week was my turn and since my birthday is at the beginning of next week, I decided to celebrate my birthday Click here to continue reading this post

Sep 012007
 

[Translate] I guess I am on a spice kick right now, but then spices are the key ingredient in Middle Eastern food. I bought some sumac a while ago and have been meaning to make something with it and today is the day. Sumac has a sour and vaguely lemony taste and grows wild in the Mediterranean and in much of the Middle East. It is a popular condiment in Turkey and Iran, where it’s liberally sprinkled on kebabs and rice, or mixed with onions as an appetizer or salad. The Palestinians, Lebanese, Syrians and Egyptians add water and other spices to sumac to form a paste, and add it to meat, chicken and vegetable Click here to continue reading this post

Aug 262007
 

[Translate] Last night I made a nice light fish dish for a hot August night. PrintLemon Sole Serving Size: 2 6 fillets of sole Zest of 1 lemon Juice of 3 lemons 1 cup dry white wine 1 tablespoon fresh thyme, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced 2 tablespoons single cream (half and half), creme fraiche or thick yogurt Put approximately two tablespoons of olive oil in pan on a medium flame. Add the garlic and then the fish, lemon juice, white wine and the thyme. Cook covered for about five minutes or until the fish is done. Remove the fish and reduce the sauce to about a third, add the cream and stir until thickened. Click here to continue reading this post

Aug 202007
 

[Translate] I decided to try something new for a change. I have been wanting to play around with warka leaves for sometime now. Warka leaves are a very thin pastry, thinner than phyllo which are used to make Maghrebi savoury and sweet pastries, such as beestiya and cigars. For an good explanation of warka and Algerian cuisine, see my friend, Chef Zadi’s blog. I also made some clove-cinnamon ice cream. I really love the flavour of cloves and thought it would be an excellent compliment to the peach briwatt. It was. As usual, I doubled the amount of cloves and used about 9 cinnamon sticks. My husband loved the strong clove flavour, but you might Click here to continue reading this post

Aug 182007
 

[Translate] Tonight for Shabbat dinner, I decided to make an appetizer to remember my Uncle Alfred’s life in Colombia. We have a large Argentinian community here and with that comes delicious Argentinian empanadas, but empanadas are found all over South American, including Colombia. I decided to try making empanadas with a masa dough and beef filling. I used top sirloin ground beef instead of steak. Note: If you your dough is too wet, add a little flour to the mixture until it is elastic. PrintColombian Sirloin Empanadas Serving Size: 12 For the filling: 1 cup peeled boiling potatoes cut into 1/4-inch dice 1 tbsp. plus 1 tsp. olive oil 2 cups sirloin steak, 1/4-inch dice Click here to continue reading this post

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