Jun 062011
 

[Translate] Cheesecake and blintzes are probably the two most popular dishes that are served on the Shavuot table, but being me, I like to find at least one new dish to put on my table. One of the first recipes that caught my eye in Joan Nathan‘s new cookbook, Quiches, Kugels, and Couscous: My Search for Jewish Cooking in France, was a quick bread that had goat cheese, dried apricot and mint. The combination of the creamy goat cheese and apricots really appealed to me, and it was a simple recipe that could be made without much effort. I used sour apricots because I think that they give a stronger apricot flavor than the Mediterranean Click here to continue reading this post

Jun 162010
 

[Translate] I used to love to go to the train station in my hometown. My father would take us there every once in a while to see the trains and we would always try to get there early so he could put a penny on the rails and have the train run over them. As soon as the train was safely out of harm’s way, he would retrieve the misshapen pennies for us to take home as souvenirs of our adventure. So when I found out that the Tel Aviv municipality had painstakingly renovated an Ottoman-era train station, now unoriginally called HaTahana (The Station) near Neve Tzedek, I couldn’t wait to go and see it. Click here to continue reading this post

May 162010
 

[Translate] Chocolate is most people’s guilty pleasure, but my guilty pleasure is ice cream. And not just any ice cream, but luscious Italian gelato, preferably eaten in Italy at one of my favorite gelateria, Perche No!, in Firenze, or in Israel at Gelateria Siciliana on Ibn Givrol in Tel Aviv. I also enjoy making my own ice cream and sorbet at home, which I have blogged in several posts here. The final course for the dinner party last week was a recipe for semifreddo that intrigued me from the moment I saw it on the Food52 website. Semifreddo literally means “half-frozen” and is a frozen dessert that has a mousse-like texture from equal parts of Click here to continue reading this post

May 142010
 

[Translate] Planning a dinner party can be quite daunting, but it helps if you are the “planning type” like I am. I was a meeting planner, by profession when I lived in the States and was responsible for planning meetings, conferences, and special events for anywhere from 10 to 10,000 attendees. My parents and grandparents also entertained a lot, so I learned everything I know about dinner party planning from my Dad and paternal grandmother who both loved to host grand gourmet dinner parties. So, planning this dinner for 11 was not a problem for me.  Here are a few good tips: Plan the menu before anything else and try to make sure that each Click here to continue reading this post

May 142010
 

[Translate] We served this salad between the amuse bouche and main course as a light refresher, but you can also serve this before the dessert course. Irene chose Dalton Winery, Fume Blanc, 2008 to serve with the salad. This wine is aged in oak barrels and was a lovely crisp wine that I have also served with a fish course. PrintBaby Lettuce Salad with Pears, Blue Cheese and Candied Walnuts Serving Size: 6 1 tablespoon sherry vinegar 1 teaspoon minced shallot 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 1/2 teaspoons walnut oil or avocado oil Salt and freshly ground pepper 1 bag assorted baby lettuce 1 bunch of arugula (rocket), trimmed 1/2 cup whole walnuts 2 Click here to continue reading this post

May 092010
 

[Translate] Mimi of Israeli Kitchen and I gave a dinner party for a few Israeli bloggers this past Thursday. It was a lovely event which included a wine tasting given by Irene, who happens to be a wine steward for two well known Israeli wineries, Golan Heights and Galil Mountain. The next several posts will feature some (in italics) of the recipes and wines that were served at the dinner. The dishes we served at this dinner would be perfect for an elegant Shavuot meal. The menu was as follows: Amuse Bouche Grilled Baby Portobello Mushroom with Tomato Sauce and a Mini Potato Pancake Salad Baby lettuce leaves and rocket with Blue Cheese and Silan Click here to continue reading this post

May 302009
 

[Translate] The Hebrew word for apricot is mishmish. I think it is such a cute word and makes such a nice endearment. Okay, I know it sounds a bit silly, but I do love apricots and it is the beginning of the season here. I decided not to make a cheesecake this year for Shavout and made a apricot flognarde instead. I also carried the apricot theme for Shabbat and made a spicy apricot chicken tagine with chili, ginger, and rosemary. Dried sour apricots are the key to this tagine, so try to find them at your local store. They are called “California” dried apricots in the States. Although I didn’t make a cheesecake for Click here to continue reading this post

Jun 212008
 

[Translate] Being away for most of May didn’t give me a lot of time to decide what to make for Shavuot this year. I decided to keep it simple and not over do it. My menu was: Salad of baby mixed greens with nectarines Trout stuffed with dried apricots and pistachios Mashed potatoes with basil Steamed broccoli All of the dishes were delicious. I have to admit the trout dish really caught my eye because of the unusual stuffing. I would have never have thought that apricot and pistachios should be stuffed inside of any fish, but it really married well with the trout. The sour apricots and the crunch of the pistachios lent such Click here to continue reading this post

May 202007
 

[Translate] Before I begin, I must tell you that I am happy that this is the last holiday for a while. I am really over preparing all the holiday food. As I explained in my first entry about Shavuot, traditionally we serve dairy dishes because the Torah which we received on this day is white, pure, and sweet like milk. Among the most famous Shavuot dishes are blintzes, cheesecakes, cheese kreplach, cheese platters, sambousak and more. Most Ashkenazis have a meat meal on the night of Shavuot and a dairy meal on the day of Shavuot. The dairy meal consists of a fish dish, salads and most likely cheesecake for dessert. During Shavuot it is Click here to continue reading this post

May 172007
 

[Translate] Today is my mother’s 65th birthday and yesterday was my mother-in-law’s 90th birthday. Two great ladies celebrating two great milestones. Happy birthday Mom and Boldog születésnapot Anyós! My mother did not know how to boil water when she got married and someone was smart enough to give her the Elegant but Easy cookbook for a wedding gift. This cookbook helped my mother become the great cook she is today and one of her signature Shavuot recipes from this cookbook is Marion’s Noodle Pudding. I was never a fan of kugel, but this creamy and slightly tart noodle pudding is delicious, elegant and oh so easy to make. When I proposed making this dish to Click here to continue reading this post

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