Apr 082009
 

[Translate] Mr. BT and I would like to wish you and your family a very happy Passover. I made a Portuguese Almond Torte from a recipe by David Leite. I had to make a few adjustments to it to make it kosher for Passover, such as unfortunately having to use margarine instead of butter and I used powdered sugar to “flour” the baking pan. It smells wonderful and I am sure it it will be a delicious addition to our Seder. I am going to borrow a Passover greeting from my cousin and say: As we gather together this Pesach, may we rejoice in the ritual that binds us as a People. May the celebration Click here to continue reading this post

Mar 182009
 

[Translate] Spring is in the air and that  means it is time to start preparing for Passover, which begins on 8 April. I am not going to be doing a lot of preparation this year, but I have gathered a few interesting recipes for you to consider for your own meal. First, here is a link to all of my Passover recipes from the last couple of years. And, here are some interesting ones for you to try: Italian Passover recipes from Chef Chaim Cohen and Dr. Eli Landau Kodredo Relleno al Forno (Roast stuffed lamb with egg/lemon crust) Slow Roasted Lamb Shoulder with Almond-Mint Pesto (Omit the cheese from the recipe) Syrah-Braised Lamb Shoulder with Olives, Click here to continue reading this post

Mar 102009
 

[Translate] Chag Purim Sameach everyone. This year I added two new cookies and two new hamantashen fillings for my mishloach manot (gifts of food) that I am giving to my neighbors. The hamantashen fillings I made this year are: peach lekvar, cranberry-orange and pecan-fig. The hamantashen dough recipe and other filling recipes is here. The peach lekvar is the same recipe as the apricot lekvar, but I used dried peaches instead. The filling is deliciously peachy and the mixture of the dried figs and pecans is also a very nice filling for the hamantashen. PrintPecan-Fig Filling for Hamantashen Yield: about 3 cups 2 cups dried figs 1/2 cup seedless raisins Apple juice 1 cup toasted Click here to continue reading this post

Mar 072009
 

[Translate] Israel depends on a rainy winter for its water supply for the rest of the year. We have had a serious drought here that no one is taking seriously. However, the last few weekends we have had a significant amount of much needed rain. Rain and cold always demand hot and hearty dishes to keep us warm and cozy inside and out. There is a another sale at our local supermarket on lamb; this time the sale is on lamb neck. I don’t think lamb neck is readily available at supermarkets or butchers in most parts of the US and Canada, but you may be able to find it at a Halal butcher in Click here to continue reading this post

Jan 282009
 

[Translate] I think there are about 9 or 10 different varieties of dates grown here in Israel. Dates were always an exotic treat for me as a kid. My father made a delicious apple and date cake, and I would always sneak some of the dates to munch on. My favourite variety of dates is Medjoul, they are  luscious pieces of caramel in your mouth. They are so rich that I can only eat a couple at a time. Babkas are dime a dozen here because of the Eastern European influence on baked goods, but this is the Middle East and there is definitely a twist on things. For example, I don’t think you would find a Babka Click here to continue reading this post

Jan 042009
 

[Translate] December 30th was my 2nd wedding anniversary and we decided to wait until the weekend to celebrate. I try very hard to keep politics out of my foodblog, but I will say that even though terrible things are happening around us, we still felt we should celebrate our anniversary by making a nice meal. We have postponed birthdays and other special events over the years, but decided that we could have a comforting and quiet meal at home. We hope that the fighting will stop soon and that we can find some way to make peace with our neighbors. The meal that we made had an unintentional color theme of brown. Brown is really Click here to continue reading this post

Dec 302008
 

[Translate] I love the smell of oranges. They smell so fresh, sweet and crisp; they remind me of sunshine and happiness. Something that is a bit lacking here right now. For the past several years, I have made a panettone for Hannukah, but this year I decided I wanted to make something that would feature my favourite winter fruit, the orange. We are surrounded by so many orange trees, the smell is intoxicating and I guess I have been hypnotized by their fragrance. I had some low fat ricotta cheese begging me to do something with it, so I decided to make a yeast coffee cake with the rest of the candied orange I made the week before. Click here to continue reading this post

Oct 212008
 

[Translate] When Mimi of the Israeli Kitchen blogged about tehina biscuits in an Arab pastry shop in Tsfat, I remembered that I had a recipe for them in Janna Gur’s The Book of New Israeli Food. I happened to have all of the ingredients in the house, so I made them. They are a little different from the ones Mimi blogged about. This recipe puts the icing sugar on the dough before you bake them and the ones in Mimi’s picture are rolled in icing sugar after they are baked. The cookies are easy to make and melt-in-your-mouth delicious. A little piece of halva-like heaven. PrintTehina Biscuits Yield: about 50 biscuits from The Book of Click here to continue reading this post

Oct 112008
 

[Translate] The pomegranate originated in Persia and has been cultivated in Georgia, Armenia and the Mediterranean region for several millennia. Jewish tradition teaches that the pomegranate is a symbol for righteousness, because it is said to have 613 seeds which corresponds with the 613 mitzvot or commandments of the Torah. For this reason and others, many Jews eat pomegranates on Rosh Hashanah. However, the actual number of seeds varies with individual fruits. It is also a symbol of fertility.  Some Jewish scholars believe that it was the pomegranate, not the apple, that was the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden.Pomegranate is one of the Seven Species (שבעת המינים, Shiv’at Ha-Minim), that are mentioned in Click here to continue reading this post

Oct 062008
 

[Translate] I am still trying to finalize my menu for the pre-fast meal on Wednesday afternoon. I don’t want to over do it. For erev Yom Kippur: Roasted chicken quarters with Hashu filling (Syrian ground beef, rice and pine nuts) Steamed green beans Fruit salad For break-the-fast: Crackers Cheese Smoked Salmon Baba Ganoush About 1 hour later, we will have: Chicken soup with matza balls Pomegranate Curd Tart Mr. Baroness Tapuzina and I hope that you have an easy fast. Gmar Chatimah Tova (May you be sealed in the book of life).

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